How to make a sewing journal cover

Tuesday 29th July 2014, 16.15

Kim Niedzwiecki Cathedral window planner cover

Guest blogger Kim Niedzwiecki returns again, this time to show us how to a make a cathedral window planner cover. Plan all future sewing projects with this journal and never miss an opportunity to jot down an idea again. You can use all your scraps with this project or treat yourself to some new season’s fabric.

Kim tells us why she chose this project,

‘I wanted to make something that would be a great scrap buster, something beautiful, and something useful. The printed fabrics were the four inch squares (approximate measurements) treasures that were not used in the Lovetag quilt that I made last year. This planner cover has a secure closure and a zippered pocket to make sure that you have everything you need and that it will all stay put while you are on the go!’

 

Required items

An inexpensive planner measuring 8 ½ inches x 5 ½ inches

 

Solid fabric

Two 6 1/2 inch x 2 inch strips

Two 3 inch x 2 inch strips

Three 4 1/2 inch squares

One 11 inch x 5 1/2 inch (for zipper pocket)

One 13 inch x 3/4 inch x 10 inch (for the liner) or you can use muslin

 

Printed fabric

Fabric scraps for the scrappy cover I used 50 4 in squares

Three 2 inch square print fabric

Two 1 1/4 inch square print fabric

One 4 inch x 3 1/2 inch

Two 3 inch x 4 inch (for zipper tabs)

 

Interfacing

Lightweight fusible interfacing (I used all Pellon interfacing)

Two 10 inch x 5 1/2 inch pieces

Paper backed fusible web

Three 2 inch squares

Two 1 1/4 inch squares

Medium weight fusible interfacing

One 4 inch x 3 1/2 inch piece

 

Other bits and bobs

Thread ( for this project I used Aurifil 40wt)

Buttons of your choice

9 inch zipper

Snap or Velcro for your closure

 

Cathedral Windows Block

Firstly measure your cathedral window base fabric you will need 3 x 4.5″ squares.

Sewing journal Step 1 & 2

Fold each in half and sew the short ends closed.

Match up the center seams.

Sewing journal Step 3 & 4

Then sew the top, leaving a space in the middle to turn.

Next trim the corners, then using a turner or the back of a small paintbrush (that is what I used) try to get the points as nice a possible. Then give your square a good press!

Sewing journal Step 5, 6, 7 & 8

Press edges in to give you a guide for your center fabric.

To connect the windows, take two blocks and line the corners up.

Pin the tip and sew along the pressed line and repeat the process on the opposite side.

 

Sashing of the cathedral windows

Press the 2″ fabric strips under 1/4″.

Sewing journal Step 9,10 & 11

Pin to the back of the windows with the press mark lined up with the press mark of the window. Stitch into place and stop 1/4″ from the edge.

Take the other strip, again pressing under 1/4″ and pin it.

Open the cathedral window and sew along the seam making sure to stop at the edges of the window.

Flip the window edge over and sew the strips together making sure not to sew the window edge.

Sewing journal Step 12, 13 & 14

Attach paper backed fusible interfacing to the printed fabrics. The large background prints are 2″ and the smaller ones are approx 1 1/4″.

The edges for the larger blocks will be exposed and the interfacing will help to keep them looking tidy and in place.

Sewing journal Step 15

The window curves fall naturally into place when folded over. You can pin or glue baste them into place prior or just go pin free!

Sewing journal Step 16

You can see that the centers are not perfect and that is perfectly okay!

These are going to be covered by buttons so no worries about a little wonky. If you wish to not have buttons, you can hand stitch the centers of the windows together before you add the sashing.

Sewing journal Step 17

Trim the block to 7″ x 2 1/2″.

To finish the outer cover, dig into your Liberty print scrap bin and start piecing scraps together.

Sewing journal Step 18 & 19

Make enough of the patchwork squares to create a center action that measures 14 1/2″ x 12″. Two side flap sections that will measure 11″ x 4″ and 11″ x 3″ for the zippered flap. The back flap will measure 11″ x 5 1/2″.

Sew them all up until you have enough to measure 14 1/2″ x 12″.

Find you favorite buttons and hand stitch them on!

 

The Quilting

For the quilting, I chose straight lines with 40wt Aurifil. The 40wt gives quilting with a little more “show” and the straight lines do on compete with the beautiful flow of the cathedral windows. I used my presser foot as my guide that made for quick, easy and somewhat precise quilting lines.

Sewing journal Step 20

After the quilting trim this section to 13 3/4″ x10″.

Sewing journal Step 21

 

Zippered Pocket

The tabs are two 3″ x 4″ pieces of fabric. Press ends under 1/4″ and then fold in half.

Sewing journal Step 22 & 23

Fold over the end of the zipper and using a 1/4″  seam sew into place.

Repeat this process with other end.

Piece together two sections, one 11″ x 4″ and one 11″ x 3″ cut matching pieces of lightweight interfacing ( I used Pellon SF-101) and attach interfacing using the manufactures recommendations.

Sew each section to a solid piece of fabric using a 1/4″ seam.

Sewing journal Step 22 & 23

Time to put on your zipper foot.

Turn the fabric over and press giving a nice finished edge. Place the section on one side of the zipper. You can either pin or glue baste in place if you desire. Sew each side down along side the zipper using a stitch length of 3.3 or your preferred length.

Sewing journal Step 27 & 28

Your zipper pocket flap is finished!

Trim the zippered pouch to 10″ x 5″ and  lay the zipper front on the 10″ x 5″ piece of solid fabric.

Return your stitch length to about 2.5 and using a 1/4″ seam to sew around the entire rectangle, this creates your pocket.

Sewing journal Step 29

For the second inner flap, take the other 11″ x 5 1/2″ pieced rectangle, attach your interfacing and trim to 10″ x 5″ then put these two flaps aside.

 

The tab

Cut a 4″ x 3″ piece of fabric and a 4″ x 3″ piece of heavyweight fusible interfacing ( I used Pellon Craft Fuse). Attach interfacing using the manufacturer’s instructions.

Right side facing sew around two sides of the fabric to create a tube and trim the edges.

Turn the tube right side out and topstitch around three edges.

Sewing journal Step 30, 31 & 32

At this point you have a choice between fasteners. You can use snaps ( that was my choice) or you can use velcro. For my snap closure, I hid the male snap piece between the fabrics by using the opening at the bottom to wiggle it to the top. If you will be using velcro you can add this now and maybe try a decretive stitch to make it more fun!

 

Construction of the Planner

Lay the flap pieces right sides facing to the front and the back of the main panel and sew using a 1/4″ seam.

Leave a 2″ opening in the middle of the back flap to create a space for your tab to be inserted.

Sewing journal Step 33 & 34

Insert the snap on the right side checking to make sure of the correct placement and mark the spot for the placement of the female side of the snap or the Velcro.

Sew in place and trim the excess, next add the other side of the snap or the velcro to your planner cover.

Press seams toward the center panel and the lay the muslin or 13″ x 3/4″ x 10″  fabric on top solid fabric.

Sewing journal Step 35 & 36

Sew entirely around the panel starting on the back flap leaving a 4″ opening at the bottom so you will be able to turn the cover right side out.

After you have finished sewing, trim all the corners. Turn the sewing journal right side out and press.

Sewing journal Step 37, 38 & 39

Pin the flaps in toward the center, pin and then sew using a 1/4″ seam around the entire cover.

Make sure to trim or bury your threads.

Kim Niedzwiecki Sewing journal

Follow Kim on Twitter @gogokim

You can share your Liberty print projects with us on Instagram, Twitter and Pinterest by using #SewLiberty.

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Liberty News: A Match made in Liberty

Monday 28th July 2014, 16.16






Our fashion windows are dressed in their best sporting finery to celebrate the Commonwealth Games 2014.

liberty window dressing

It’s Liberty as you’ve never seen it before: our window dressings have had a sporty make-over in honour of the 2014 Commonwealth Games. Pop down to our Great Marlborough Street entrance and take a look – each department has a dedicated window featuring our newest hero pieces against a backdrop of service lines, nets and scoreboards.

Shop in-store or online to find your match made in Liberty

liberty mens window

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Spotlight on: Larson & Jennings

Friday 25th July 2014, 16.46

 

 

 

Anglo-Swedish watchmaker, Larsson & Jennings, are taking the timepiece scene by storm. We caught up with the discreet team to get the 411 on combining two styles of European design, strap preferences and their top tips for buying watches.

Which watch are you wearing now?
It’s really hot in London today so we’re wearing the CM | Gold – the lightweight Milanese chain metal is nice and cool in the heat, plus the colour looks good with a tan.

Do you wear the same watch all the time or change it to suit your mood?
We like to change it up. Our core watches have quick-release straps so you can swap the styles to suit the mood or activity you’re doing at that time.

What do you love about Swedish and British style?
Both nations have incredibly rich history and design identities, which offer a wealth of styles to be inspired by from both the past and present.

How have you brought these elements to your watch designs?
By combining the classic British dress watch aesthetic with the paired back minimalism that’s so popular and effective in Swedish design, we’ve brought elements of each nation’s signature styles together to create one product that bridges both.

Your watches are popular with guys and girls. What is it about your designs that make them great unisex pieces?
The simplistic design, the lightweight feel and the high quality fabrics and materials make the watch both functional and easy to wear. Plus the 40mm case size of our classic ranges lend itself well to both men and women.

Canvas, leather or metal strap?
We couldn’t possibly choose. It really depends on the wearers aesthetic and style. The Larsson & Jennings watch case and dial is a mix of classic and contemporary so any of the strap categories work as long as you are you looking for a clean and uncomplicated watch.

If you could give one piece of advice on buying a watch it would be…
As well as looking for comfort and great design, the most important thing has to be good manufacture. Our watches are made with precision engineering in Switzerland so that they’re the best quality they can be at the current price point. At the end of the day it’s a functional item so it’s got to work as well as look stylish. We’re launching new watch styles later this year and look forward to sharing them with old and new customers.

Photo by Lucy Williams from Fashion Me Now

Photo by Lucy Williams from Fashion Me Now

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Trending: Alfresco Dining Ideas

Monday 21st July 2014, 16.32

 

 

Everyone’s been thinking about alfresco dining ideas.

With the recent heatwave hitting the UK hard, it’s been difficult not to spend all our time outdoors. Our new Flowers of Liberty range of luxurious, English-made homeware and gifts has been sliding off the shelves quicker than you can  say Mary Berry this week – and for good reason.

Covered in our stunning Theodora Liberty print, our collection of plates, placemats and table accessories is the only way to serve up summertime dishes when dining alfresco.

Be inspired for your own garden outdoor dining ideas and share your pictures with us @Liberty #FlowersOfLiberty.

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Beauty Beat: A Cheat’s Guide to Flawless Foundation

Friday 18th July 2014, 16.42

 

 

Liberty Beauty Buyer, Sarah Coonan spreads her beauty tips on choosing and applying the right foundation for a flawless, expert finish.

Foundation is probably the most important step in any make-up routine. The wrong foundation, when poorly applied, can be really ageing and look mask-like. Luckily, finding the best foundation is much easier than you think and application doesn’t need to take hours. We’ve pulled together some of our favourite makeup tips and tricks to help you achieve an enviably flawless base.

Step 1. Find the perfect colour

Foundation should match your skin as closely as possible, and I recommend visiting a make-up counter for advice. Always test it on your skin and ideally in natural light. If you don’t feel confident the colour is quite right ask for a sample and try it at home. There’s nothing worse than investing in a great foundation and then not using it because the colour is poorly matched.

 

Step 2. Take a lesson

Nothing beats a one-to-one tuition with a great make-up artist. Pop into store for a lesson and you’ll pick up a handy arsenal of tips. The assistants on our beauty counters are make-up artists too and many of them do freelance work so they really know their stuff. Don’t automatically head to the brand you always use, have a look round and only seek advice from someone with flawlessly applied foundation. If theirs isn’t applied well I find it hard to take their advice seriously.

 

Step 3. Cherry pick

I’m a firm believer in finding the very best product you can, rather than buying everything from one brand. They may have the best foundations but if their primer or brushes aren’t up to scratch you aren’t going to get the best results. My make up bag is a big mix of products and the best ones for you will vary depending on your skin type, the time of year and what look you want to achieve. For me, I love Hourglass Veil Mineral Primer, Chantecaille Future Skin Foundation, Trish McEvoy Correct and Brighten for under the eye, and Laura Mercier Secret Camouflage for any blemishes. I’m not keen on an overly powdered look so my go to products are either Chantecaille HD Powder or Hourglass Ambient Powder.

 

Step 4. Tailor your products

Depending on the look you want to achieve, you will need to use the right products. If you want dewy skin, a mattifying primer is going to work against you, so either skip the primer altogether or use something like Laura Mercier Radiance Primer. For velvety skin, I swear by Hourglass Veil Fluid Make Up and if you want a really natural look and don’t need too much cover you really can’t beat Laura Mercier’s Tinted Moisturisers.

 

Step 5. Find the right tools

Now you have the perfect products, you need to make sure you’re applying them correctly! Much of this is down to personal preference, but certain tools will help you achieve a really precise look. For an airbrushed finish, a damp Beauty Blender is a godsend. It’s quick, totally mistake-proof and gives the most beautiful coverage using just the right amount of product. When it comes to brushes, quality is the key. This doesn’t mean you have to spend a fortune, but do your research first. My favourites for foundation are: Trish McEvoy’s Sheer Mistake-Proof Brush, Hourglass No. 2 (the most versatile brush you will ever use) and London Brush Co. Pyramid Brush.

 

Step 6. Learn from the professionals

YouTube is an amazing resource where you can get advice from great artists and real people alike. Some of our favourites are Pixiwoo, Wayne Goss and Lisa Eldridge – and the beauty is you can practice while you watch. This is also a great way to get completely impartial advice about which products to use. Wayne Goss has some really great videos about foundation and applying it. His advice is super easy to follow and he is always brutally honest about the products.

 

Three Tips from Our Artists

Abida from Trish McEvoy

For an airbrushed finish use Trish’s Sheer Mistake Proof Brush to stipple on foundation. Using fast circular motions to blend gives you a really light, even coverage that you can build up.

 

Anastasia from NARS

I like using my fingers to apply foundation as the heat really helps to melt the product into your skin leaving a really natural finish. Alternatively, I like to use a Beauty Blender slightly wetted.

Yen – Shu Uemura

A good base to even out skin, correct pigmentation and bring down redness is essential for a flawless look. The key is to use a great primer of base product like our UV Underbase. Also, don’t overcompensate with foundation to cover up blemishes. Less is more!

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